The Big Picture of Business – Wisdom From the Disasters, Recovery Through Compassion and Resilience

StrategyDriven Entrepreneurship ArticleThe month of September saw natural disasters. In times of crisis, people came together to help each other.

Forces of nature: from disasters came citizens with noble hearts and a willingness to serve others. Young people sought to help, thus inspiring lifelong commitments to community stewardship. The beacons of light came from caring people, corporate contributors and a spirit of goodwill.

Wisdom from hurricanes and natural disasters: Bring your hearts and your hands. The worst disasters bring out the best in caring, compassionate people.

Hurricane storms do not redefine who communities are… they make communities stronger. Volunteers are the glue to resilient communities. In rebuilding after hurricanes, don’t just build the way it was. When there are tragedies, there will always be helpers. Heroism emerging from Harvey and Irma.

The more we do for others, the more we feel the “potlache” of giving to others. Natural disaster stages: Warning, hit, search and rescue, recovery, rebounding, analysis, flood prevention planning, learning from crisis, community development.

Commit to a program of volunteering. Heart warming scenes of neighbors helping each other in disaster spark the passion of citizens to contribute further. Ongoing community needs for volunteers are supplied by Volunteer Houston: http://www.volunteerhou.org. This is the central contact, as they work with hundreds of non-profit organizations in the greater Houston area, ascertaining needs and scheduling volunteers. Volunteer Houston gave me their Lifetime Achievement Award two years ago. To volunteer statewide in Texas, OneStar Foundation is the coordinating entity: http://onestarfoundation.org.

Houston Strong motivational campaign launched. It embodies resilience, rebounding from disaster, teamwork and volunteer spirit. Other memorable campaigns have included: Houston Proud, Texas Cares, Clutch City, H-Town, The City With No Limits, Houston’s Hot, Magnolia City, Bayou City, Energy Capitol, Space City, Texas Sesquicentennial, Texas State of Mind, Don’t Mess With Texas, Spirit of Texas. There were classic radio jingles: “My Home Town” and “Sounds of the City.” And there was “Houston Legends,” my seventh book, a comprehensive city history that inspired community forums, volunteer recognition and nostalgia.

George R. Brown would be so proud that the convention center bearing his name would temporarily house flood victims. He was a community leader and would be warmly greeting the citizens if he were here today. I knew Mr. Brown in the 1960s and 1970s, first as friends of President Lyndon B. Johnson, then later serving together on charity boards. His favorite accomplishments included the establishment of intercity educational and daycare programs. He was born in Belton, TX, joined the U.S. Marines in World War I and co-founded the construction firm Brown and Root. Pictured, GRB and brother Herman Brown. GRB and LBJ.

There are 23,000 non-profit organizations in the greater Houston area, in action to assist flood victims and citizens in need. Many other cities are sending rescue vehicles, supplies and volunteers. Kudos to friends and community supporters. Volunteers are always to be thanked for their service. In crises and other times, neighbors help each other.

In recovery from the disaster weather crisis, it is important to honor volunteers for their service. The more we do, the more we feel the “potlache” of giving to others.

Realities of giving and charity:

  • Ego charities benefit the organizers.
  • Celebrities often get duped into promoting causes.
  • Charitable involvement is not a game or contest.
  • Most companies give to communities.
  • Cause-related marketing is a good thing.
  • Some companies use “philanthropy” as a marketing scam.

Best advice to You, the Humanitarian:

  • Give generously.
  • Pick causes about which you are passionate.
  • Serve causes which serve many.
  • Your time is your most valuable commodity.

We’re a very giving society and want to make a difference. Companies making donations should be recognized. Human caring and hours of their volunteer service are what matters most. After the crisis, many unsung heroes render glorious service behind the scenes, where it matters.

Love and respect to the humanitarians.


About the Author

Hank MoorePower Stars to Light the Business Flame, by Hank Moore, encompasses a full-scope business perspective, invaluable for the corporate and small business markets. It is a compendium book, containing quotes and extrapolations into business culture, arranged in 76 business categories.

Hank’s latest book functions as a ‘PDR of business,’ a view of Big Picture strategies, methodologies and recommendations. This is a creative way of re-treading old knowledge to enable executives to master change rather than feel as they’re victims of it.

Power Stars to Light the Business Flame is now out in all three e-book formats: iTunes, Kindle, and Nook.

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