StrategyDriven Resource Management Article

Resource Management Best Practice 2 – Categorical Activity Prioritization

StrategyDriven Resource Management ArticleAn organization’s mission defines its purpose for being. Making the mission measurable and then prioritizing those measures helps create a sense of where the organization should focus its efforts. However, prioritization at this level does not create the clarity needed for individuals making resource allocation choices between their day-to-day activities, especially if the activities all serve the same mission measure.


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About the Author

Nathan Ives, StrategyDriven Principal is a StrategyDriven Principal and Host of the StrategyDriven Podcast. For over twenty years, he has served as trusted advisor to executives and managers at dozens of Fortune 500 and smaller companies in the areas of management effectiveness, organizational development, and process improvement. To read Nathan’s complete biography, click here.

StrategyDriven Resource Projection Forum

Business planning is the art and science of identifying what a company should and should not do balanced by its available resources. While much of business planning focuses on setting strategic direction and defining tactical activities, achieving balance requires that significant attention be given to the critical area of resource projection.

Annualized resource projection involves a number of processes that together paint a picture of the organization’s resource availability and needs. Creation of this picture begins with development of two key elements: resource availability and standardized activity assumptions. These assumptions are then applied to the proposed activities identified during the alternative development process. The resulting all encompassing list of resource loaded activities is further honed through an iterative process involving resource projection and alternative selection into the final portfolio of activities to be pursued. Derived from this portfolio is the organization’s time bound resource availability and needs.

Capacity planning refines the annualized resource projections; giving the organization insight to the additional resources needed in order to account for the inefficiencies associated with resource scheduling; personnel hiring delays and qualification; and equipment maintenance, calibration, and retooling. Each of these inefficiencies prevent resources from being available one hundred percent of the time; thereby forcing the organization to either increase its asset base or decrease its level of activity. Capacity planning reveals the average level of inefficiency providing insight to the resource and activity planning adjustments to be made.

Focus of the Resource Projection Forum

Materials in this forum are dedicated to discussing the leading practices of companies successfully executing a resource projection program in support of strategic planning. The following articles, podcasts, documents, and resources cover those topics critical to a strong resource projection program.

Articles

Best Practices

Warning Flags

Documents

Whitepapers

Recommended Resource – The Five Dysfunctions of a Team

The Five Dysfunctions of a Team: A Leadership Fable
by Patrick M. Lencioni

About the Reference

The Five Dysfunctions of a Team: A Leadership Fable by Patrick M. Lencioni examines five obstacles to effective teamwork. Focused on the executive team, Mr. Lencioni illustrates the harmful effects diminished teamwork has on an organization’s effectiveness. He then prescribes actions that can be taken to overcome these obstacles thereby increasing overall organizational performance.

Benefits of Using this Reference

StrategyDriven contributors believe that an organization can only perform effectively if there exists a cohesive, aligned, action-oriented executive team guiding it. We like The Five Dysfunctions of a Team because it highlights the common barriers to effective teamwork and an actionable process for overcoming these barriers. While the process presented focuses on an organization’s executive team, we believe the same principles can be used to improve teamwork at all levels of the organization. Additionally, Mr. Lencioni’s recommended actions support what StrategyDriven contributors believe is key to sustained, superior success; shared vision, focus, and commitment.

As a business novel, The Five Dysfunctions of a Team presents its principles for improved teamwork through a believable, vividly illustrated, and easily related to story of an organization’s struggle to improve performance. Many of the best practice recommendations found on the StrategyDriven website compliment the actions prescribed in The Five Dysfunctions of a Team; making this book a StrategyDriven recommended read.

StrategyDriven Organizational Performance Measures Best Practice Article

Organizational Performance Measures Best Practice 5 – One Source of the Truth

StrategyDriven Organizational Performance Measure Best PracticeMeasurement of observable variables has always been as much an art as it is a science. How, when, where, and with what we measure observables highly influences the values derived.


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StrategyDriven Resource Management Article

Resource Management Best Practice 1 – Attract the Best with Accountability

StrategyDriven Resource Management ArticleIn today’s competitive environment, it is no longer good enough to offer employees a good place to work. Rather, it is imperative a company creates a work environment where the best want to work. Only when such an environment exists will a company attract and retain the most knowledgeable, skilled, and accomplished employees; who in-turn will effectively execute its activities and make it a viable competitor in an increasingly aggressive marketplace.


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Additional Resources

StrategyDriven contributors recommend the following resource that elaborate or compliment the Attract the Best with Accountability best practice:

Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap… and Others Don’t
by Jim Collins


About the Author

Nathan Ives, StrategyDriven Principal is a StrategyDriven Principal and Host of the StrategyDriven Podcast. For over twenty years, he has served as trusted advisor to executives and managers at dozens of Fortune 500 and smaller companies in the areas of management effectiveness, organizational development, and process improvement. To read Nathan’s complete biography, click here.