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Strategic Planning Best Practice 9 – Avoid Using Jargon

StrategyDriven Strategic Planning Best PracticeNot everyone within an organization is a Harvard MBA graduate with a decade or more of business planning experience. Business planners using highly technical terms as a way to impress others with their business planning prowess will often find that they confuse the very people they are trying to communicate with, namely, the organization’s workforce.

In order for a strategic plan to foster a high degree of organizational alignment, it must possess a clear, concise focus and be translatable to the day-to-day actions of every member of the workforce. To achieve this, planners should write the strategic plan in a language familiar to everyone within the organization; incorporating words, phrases, and colloquialisms traditionally used by the workforce. A strategic plan written in the organization’s language will speak to and ultimately be embraced by its implementers.


About the Author

Nathan Ives, StrategyDriven Principal is a StrategyDriven Principal and Host of the StrategyDriven Podcast. For over twenty years, he has served as trusted advisor to executives and managers at dozens of Fortune 500 and smaller companies in the areas of management effectiveness, organizational development, and process improvement. To read Nathan’s complete biography, click here.

StrategyDriven Podcast Episode 1 – What is a Strategy Driven Organization?

StrategyDriven Podcasts focus on the tools and techniques executives and managers can use to improve their organization’s alignment and accountability to ultimately achieve superior results. These podcasts elaborate on the best practice and warning flag articles on the StrategyDriven website.

Episode 1 – What is a Strategy Driven Organization? introduces the StrategyDriven Podcast series by examining…

  • what makes an organization strategy driven
  • do strategy driven organizations really exist
  • what actions can executives and managers take to create a strategy driven organization
  • why should an organization work to become strategy driven

About the Contributor

Nathan Ives, StrategyDriven Principal is a StrategyDriven Principal, and Host of the StrategyDriven Podcast. For over twenty years, he has served as trusted advisor to executives and managers at dozens of Fortune 500 and smaller companies in the areas of management effectiveness, organizational development, and process improvement. To read Nathan’s complete biography, click here.

Strategic Planning – Why Do Organizations Need Strategic Planning

Do you know of an organization that performs extremely well during a crisis? Maybe your own?

StrategyDriven Strategic Planning PrincipleOrganizations do well during times of crisis because executives, managers, and individual contributors all gain clarity of purpose, expectation, and action. Clarity, along with a sense of urgency, breaks down organizational barriers allowing people to work efficiently together toward achievement of the shared goal(s). These factors enable the organization to resolve the crisis quickly and return to normal operations.


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About the Author

Nathan Ives, StrategyDriven Principal is a StrategyDriven Principal and Host of the StrategyDriven Podcast. For over twenty years, he has served as trusted advisor to executives and managers at dozens of Fortune 500 and smaller companies in the areas of management effectiveness, organizational development, and process improvement. To read Nathan’s complete biography, click here.