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Recommended Resource – Silos, Politics, and Turf Wars

Silos, Politics and Turf Wars: A Leadership Fable About Destroying the Barriers That Turn Colleagues Into Competitors
by Patrick M. Lencioni

About the Reference

Silos, Politics and Turf Wars: A Leadership Fable About Destroying the Barriers That Turn Colleagues Into Competitors by Patrick M. Lencioni examines the organizational barriers that prevent the free flow of information and resources thereby degrading overall corporate performance. Focused on the relationships and inner workings of the executive team, Mr. Lencioni provides a process for breaking down these barriers and enhancing organizational focus on mission objectives.

Benefits of Using this Reference

StrategyDriven contributors like Silos, Politics and Turf Wars because it provides insights to the common causes of organizational barriers and an actionable process for overcoming them. While the process presented focuses on realizing annual and near-term objectives, we believe it can be naturally extended to more strategic goals. Additionally, Mr. Lencioni’s process supports what StrategyDriven contributors believe is key to sustained, superior success; vision, focus, and commitment.

As a business novel, Silos, Politics and Turf Wars presents its principles of for improved effectiveness through a series of believable, vividly illustrated, and easily related to stories of four organizations evolving toward improved performance. Additionally, many of the best practice recommendations found on the StrategyDriven website relate to Silos, Politics and Turf Wars; making it a StrategyDriven recommended read.

Recommended Resource – The Effective Executive

The Effective Executive: The Definitive Guide to Getting the Right Things Done
by Peter F. Drucker

About the Reference

The Effective Executive: The Definitive Guide to Getting the Right Things Done by Peter F. Drucker focuses on self-management rather than on the management of others. The book addresses how an individual can become more effective in key activities such as time management, activity prioritization, and decision-making to the furtherance of their organization’s goals.

Benefits of Using this Reference

As discussed previously, StrategyDriven Contributors believe that because an organization’s actions are defined by its people and not the buildings, machines, and tools they use, organizations themselves fundamentally behave like people. Subsequently, as individuals become more effective, such that their decisions and activities are increasingly focused on mission achievement, the organization itself is more likely to achieve greater levels of success. Therefore, when the principles of The Effective Executive are built into processes and procedures, additional measurable improvements in organizational effectiveness can be achieved.

The Effective Executive clearly and concisely conveys several powerful concepts. Many of the best practice recommendations found on the StrategyDriven website relate to The Effective Executive; making it a StrategyDriven recommended read.

Strategic Analysis Best Practice 1 – Integrity Without Excuses

For any strategic analysis to be effective, it must be done with an open, honest assessment of the facts. Organizations acting with integrity without excuses seek to identify and eliminate instances where fact-based assessment conclusions are diluted by unrelated factors or opinion-based influences. Hi there! This article is available for free. Login or register as a StrategyDriven Personal Business Advisor Self-Guided Client by: Subscribing to the Self Guided Program - It's Free!

Strategic Planning Best Practice 2 – Prioritize the Mission

Ideally, an organization’s mission statement would convey a singular purpose. However, mission statements often enumerated several purposes, such as creating shareholder value, contributing to the community, and offering workforce prosperity. When this occurs, organizations struggle to serve multiple masters.

Prioritizing the mission establishes the relative importance of an organization’s multiple purposes; focusing decisions and driving actions toward achievement of the organization’s primary purpose while allowing progress to be made on objectives of lesser importance. The amount of emphasis given to each purpose should make their relative importance obvious to all members of the organization. Additionally, decision-making should demonstratively reflect and reinforce the mission priorities such that a proportionate amount of managerial attention and organizational resources are applied to the achievement of each purpose.


About the Author

Nathan Ives, StrategyDriven Principal is a StrategyDriven Principal and Host of the StrategyDriven Podcast. For over twenty years, he has served as trusted advisor to executives and managers at dozens of Fortune 500 and smaller companies in the areas of management effectiveness, organizational development, and process improvement. To read Nathan’s complete biography, click here.

Strategic Planning Best Practice 1 – Make the Mission Measurable

StrategyDriven Strategic Planning Best PracticeAn organization’s mission statement defines its purpose, its reason for being. These statements, however, tend to be broad and somewhat vague; making it difficult to identify the specific products, services, initiatives, and people that will most directly enable the organization to achieve its purpose.

Making the mission measurable provides the added clarity needed to focus decisions and drive actions toward achievement of the organization’s purpose. The mission is translated into a time-bound measure of performance rather than a specific goal. The value of competing alternatives can then be evaluated against the measure; offering executives and managers a mission contribution basis for the selection and pursuit of specific business opportunities.


About the Author

Nathan Ives, StrategyDriven Principal is a StrategyDriven Principal and Host of the StrategyDriven Podcast. For over twenty years, he has served as trusted advisor to executives and managers at dozens of Fortune 500 and smaller companies in the areas of management effectiveness, organizational development, and process improvement. To read Nathan’s complete biography, click here.