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Different Ways to Promote Creativity in the Workplace

StrategyDriven Innovation Article | Different Ways to Promote Creativity in the WorkplaceWhen it comes to the workplace, people often emphasize traditional themes such as productivity and collaboration. However, there are many other valuable traits that employees can bring to the office and that managers should embrace. One of the most underrated features that you should promote in your workplace is creativity. Creativity can have a multitude of benefits for you and your workers, such as increased output and a higher sense of enthusiasm. Here are some simple but effective ways to foster creativity among your employees.

Give Employees Room to Explore

You’ll never know what your team is capable of if you don’t give them the chance to test their boundaries. To truly let your employees thrive, give them plenty of space to explore new opportunities and ask new questions. Engaging in this form of self-discovery allows your employees to have a sense of freedom while doing their jobs. Always be open to their suggestions and encourage them to propose new ideas. While not every attempt will be successful, each one can give your team a valuable learning experience that has the potential to help them thrive.

Use the Right Tools

The tools that your company utilizes on a day-to-day basis ultimately define its approach to creativity in the workplace. In order to make the most of the tools and technology that your employees use, make sure to confirm that they foster creative thinking in every way. It’s always a good idea to regularly evaluate your company’s technology to ensure that it’s facilitating your employees’ work as much as possible. From updated devices to new workflow automation software, making use of the proper tools can give your team more space to explore their creativity.

Celebrate Diversity

If you’re looking for a way to naturally incorporate creativity into your team, try to pay attention to the employees themselves. Members of diverse teams are much more likely to bring a variety of thoughts, opinions and suggestions to the table. This wide array of ideas can feed the overall creativity in your workplace and increase everyone’s enthusiasm as a result. Whether an employee has a suggestion about a project she’s working on or a proposal regarding the new Miratech software, you never know what kinds of ideas you’ll encounter when you emphasize diversity.

Don’t be hesitant about exploring the creative potential of your team at work. If you embrace this valuable trait, you can watch your employees thrive in a variety of ways.

Boredom: A Route To Creativity

We live our lives, these days, with continuous stimulation – on-demand access to movies, articles, friends, books, games and music. With all possible, all the time, how can we hear ourselves think long enough for new and creative ideas to emerge?

I don’t know about you, but my mental commotion from a week of stress causes interminable noise coming from where my ideas should be. And given I’m a thinker, hearing myself think is fundamental. I tried freeing up an hour or two during a week to sit quietly in hopes of hearing my creative voice, but that wasn’t sufficient. I needed a broader time span free of the stimulations involved with daily living. And given my schedule, the only time I had available was weekends. Hence, weekends of boredom.

I now spend at least two weekends a month alone and off-line – off-line, as in no phone, no (on-line) social activity, and no email. A friend said “I would be bored out of my mind!” Precisely.

Do I like being bored? Not particularly. It’s not necessarily fun: sometimes I’m jumping out of my skin and must force myself to not call a friend. But if I can wait it out, I’m on my way to something unimaginable.

How I Create Boredom and Listen to Myself

Here’s my Idea Generating Action Plan for a weekend: I stimulate my mental component with gobs of fresh ideas (reading voraciously, listening to interviews of interesting people and interesting programs on NPR, watching documentaries); I walk 6 miles around the lake to stimulate my physical side; I listen to music and meditate to recruit my spiritual side. And by Sunday afternoon I’m ready to do nothing. To sit quietly and be bored. I sit. And sit. And then, just before I am ready to exterminate myself, the magic happens. The ideas begin to flow.

New ideas. Surprising ideas. Interesting ideas. Stupid ideas. I don’t judge. I just write them all down. This past weekend I began sketching out an Advanced Coaching program (based on my new book What?) to offer meta tools so coaches and leaders could hear clients without bias, assumptions, or triggers, and then know how to make the best interventions. First thing Monday I connected with two coaching schools who may have interest in collaborating. I’m not always this successful. But sometimes I am.

Boredom as a route to creativity is not for everyone. But I think many of us need something extreme to have the space to listen to ourselves, to have a block of time to clear our brain and silence our Internal Dialogue to enable our unique ideas. Some folks do this by going for a long run, or swim a mile or two. New ideas do emerge for me at the gym, but the inspirational ones – the hidden ones – come only after space and silence appear.

How do you listen to yourself? What are you listening for when you listen? Do you allow the time and space for an opening that enables emerging ideas? Ask yourself these questions, then ask the big one: What would you need to consider to be willing to take the time to hear yourself without barriers and literally brainstorm with yourself?

I now have many volumes of Idea Binders. Only about 20% of those ideas made it to completion although I do seek ways for each of them to develop. But if I hadn’t come up with them all, I would not have invented Buying Facilitation®, or invented a new form of question, or coded how we can hear each other without misinterpretation, or written 9 books or 1300 articles, or started up companies.

Try it. At least once – at least when an important meeting is coming up and you want to shine. Spend a weekend alone somewhere in the countryside, with no texting, no email, no telephone, no TV, no people. Nothin’. Then allow yourself to go a bit crazy. The silence of the first day might be a relief. By day two, when you’re jumping out of your skin, you might end up hearing a very creative voice inside. Maybe not. Maybe you will have wasted a weekend and will email me to tell me I’m nuts. But just maybe, you’ll hear yourself come up with the new, new thing. If you do, you can give me an attribution.

If you’re interested in listening without bias or assumptions, download my free book (no sign up required) on www.didihearyou.com. The book, What? Did you really say what I think I heard? is filled with original thinking on how we misinterpret, bias, misunderstand others, and how to close the gap between what’s said and what’s heard. It’s fun, practical, and (I’m told) is a game changer. Enjoy.


About the Author

Sharon Drew Morgen is founder of Morgen Facilitations, Inc. (www.newsalesparadigm.com). She is the visionary behind Buying Facilitation®, the decision facilitation model that enables people to change with integrity. A pioneer who has spoken about, written about, and taught the skills to help buyers buy, she is the author of the acclaimed New York Times Business Bestseller Selling with Integrity and Dirty Little Secrets: Why buyers can’t buy and sellers can’t sell and what you can do about it.

To contact Sharon Drew at [email protected] or go to www.didihearyou.com to choose your favorite digital site to download your free book.

StrategyDriven Podcast Special Edition 6b – An Interview with Gregory Berns, author of Iconoclast: A Neuroscientist Reveals How to Think Differently, part 2 of 2

StrategyDriven Podcasts focus on the tools and techniques executives and managers can use to improve their organization’s alignment and accountability to ultimately achieve superior results. These podcasts elaborate on the best practice and warning flag posts on the StrategyDriven website.

Special Edition 6b – An Interview with Gregory Berns, author of Iconoclast: A Neuroscientist Reveals How to Think Differently, part 2 of 2 examines what makes iconoclasts so astoundingly creative and successful. During the second part of our discussion, Gregory Berns, author of Iconoclast: A Neuroscientist Reveals How to Think Differently and Distinguished Chair of Neuroeconomics at Emory University, shares with us his insights regarding:

  • encouraging employee creativity with a culture of openness
  • combating group think in decision-making
  • fostering iconoclastic behavior within an organization

Additional Information

Complimenting the tremendous insights Greg shares in Iconoclast and this special edition podcast are the additional publications accessible from his website (www.ccnl.emory.edu/greg/). Greg’s book, Iconoclast, can be purchased by clicking here.

Contribute to the Study of Iconoclasm

Want to be a participant in Emory University’s Computation and Cognitive Neuroscience Lab research? Click here to learn more about the study, find out if you qualify, and apply to become a participant.

(Eligibility criteria apply and participant consent required.)


About the Author

StrategyDriven Expert Contributor | Gregory BernsGregory Berns, author of Iconoclast, is Distinguished Chair of Neuroeconomics at Emory University where he is a professor in the department of Psychiatry and Economics at the Goizueta Business School. A pioneer in the field of neuroeconomics, his research has been featured in the New York Times, Forbes, the Wall Street Journal, and Money. To read Greg’s full biography, click here.

StrategyDriven Podcast Special Edition 6a – An Interview with Gregory Berns, author of Iconoclast: A Neuroscientist Reveals How to Think Differently, part 1 of 2

StrategyDriven Podcasts focus on the tools and techniques executives and managers can use to improve their organization’s alignment and accountability to ultimately achieve superior results. These podcasts elaborate on the best practice and warning flag posts on the StrategyDriven website.

Special Edition 6a – An Interview with Gregory Berns, author of Iconoclast: A Neuroscientist Reveals How to Think Differently, part 1 of 2 examines what makes iconoclasts so astoundingly creative and successful. During our discussion, Gregory Berns, author of Iconoclast: A Neuroscientist Reveals How to Think Differently and Distinguished Chair of Neuroeconomics at Emory University, shares with us his insights regarding:

  • who are iconoclasts
  • the three characteristic traits of an iconoclast
  • how perception influences creativity and actions individuals can take to expand their perception
  • the impact of courage on iconoclasm

Additional Information

Complimenting the tremendous insights Greg shares in Iconoclast and this special edition podcast are the additional publications accessible from his website (www.ccnl.emory.edu/greg/). Greg’s book, Iconoclast, can be purchased by clicking here.


About the Author

StrategyDriven Expert Contributor | Gregory BernsGregory Berns, author of Iconoclast, is Distinguished Chair of Neuroeconomics at Emory University where he is a professor in the department of Psychiatry and Economics at the Goizueta Business School. A pioneer in the field of neuroeconomics, his research has been featured in the New York Times, Forbes, the Wall Street Journal, and Money. To read Greg’s full biography, click here.