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Talent Management Best Practice 1 – Ensure Employability

Decades ago, an individual typically had the opportunity to work for their entire career within one company. Times have changed. Process automation and streamlining as a form of cost reduction has driven corporate rightsizing; eliminating the lifelong job security of times past and heightening employment risk. Combined with evolving employee tastes and a need to increase productivity, talent development takes on new importance.


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StrategyDriven recommends a number of programs and resources to help further develop executives, managers, and employees. These are included in our:

  • Practices for Professionals: tried and true actions that enhance personal performance effectiveness and efficiency
  • Tools for Professionals: products and services that help professionals become more organized, connected, and efficient
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Fire the Slugs! And Other Great, No-Nonsense Ways to Retain Your Best People

StrategyDriven Organizational Accountability ArticleThere isn’t an organization anywhere that doesn’t have a problem with some type of personnel turnover problems. Depending on the study you look at, the impact of turnover ranges from three months of salary for a low level employee who leaves to as high as 400 percent of the annual salary of an upper-level person who leaves.

It’s doesn’t have to be all bad. There’s good turnover and bad turnover.

Firing a non-performer is good turnover. When a top performer leaves to go elsewhere and leaves your organization with a huge void, that’s bad turnover. It can affect the performance of the whole organization.

If you are going to maximize your organization’s performance you have to make a conscious, binding top-down management decision and commitment to develop a no nonsense approach to retention. The following are several must-do actions items for retaining the high-value human assets you’ve worked so hard to acquire:

  1. Start at the top! Assess your supervisory and management team! Seventy percent of the people say that the worst thing about their job is the boss. Find out what’s wrong and fix it! Identify the prima donnas and micromanaging control freaks, the whiners, complainers, and blamers. Get them basic supervisory training and improve their performance continuously. If you are the boss, take ownership!
  2. Clean Up the House! Identify the non-performers. Identify the poor managers and supervisors. If they do not respond to training and show significant improvement, remove them from an influential role and replace them with someone that does what is truly desired and required for the role and position they are in.
  3. Manage Visibly! Get out of the ivory tower. Begin each day by walking around. Stroll around the floor several times a day. Meet the customers, talk with employees, visit with the supervisors, greet the vendors, help the delivery trucks load and unload. Get out of your office. Let people know you are there and that you care. The point here is that you set lead by example. If they like you they are less likely to leave you. Visibility drives retention.
  4. Care About Your People! If you don’t really care about your people, your business is doomed. Caring is the reason why people stay. Get to know your people. Learn what each person likes and enjoys. Listen to them and learn about their interests, families, and hobbies. Protect your people from harm and from others in your organization. People are loyal to those who care about them and care for them.
  5. Keep your door open 80% of the time. Let your people know you are accessible to them. Avoid telling people to make an appointment or come back later. Make sure the time you do spend with your people is quality time.
  6. Focus on Employee Assistance Actively. Sit down with the other managers in your organization and identify the problems that are faced by people in your workforce. Develop innovative ideas and deploy specific new plans to provide employees with more flexibility in their work, support for their common needs, and help for dealing with personal issues that impact their life.
  7. Treat Everyone with Respect Always! Every leader and manager and supervisor must set the standard that respectful behavior and sincere open appreciation are expected with no exceptions! Investigate and take immediate action for all non-respectful behavior incidents. Have the managers and supervisors bring food to be shared on a regular basis! Break bread with your people regularly instead of forcing people to eat baloney.
  8. Ask Your People What They Want! Sit down with your people and ask them what they want out of their work. Identify what they want to grow, to develop greater control, autonomy and responsibility for the work they do for you. Help them achieve these goals specifically and incrementally. Meaningful engagement in their own future drives commitment and loyalty.
  9. Tell Your People What You Want of Them! Be specific and be clear but make sure you explain what you expect of them. Give them the tools, support and the time they need to get the work done. If they do not meet your expectations, bring them in and talk with them and find out what it will take to get them on track.
  10. Fire the Slugs. Hold your people accountable for their performance. If they don’t solve the problem, then terminate them with respect and dignity. Your good performers will love you.

About the Author

Jeff Kortes is known as the ‘No Nonsense Guy.’ He is the President of Human Asset Management LLC, a human resource consulting firm specializing in executive search and leadership training. He has trained hundreds of first-line supervisors, managers, and executives during his career. His approach to training is no-nonsense, and practical.

Jeff is also a member of the National Speakers Association and a regular speaker on the topics of retention, recruiting and leadership. For more information, visit www.SlugProofYourTeam.com.

Recruitment Strategy

Many companies do not understand how to approach developing a recruitment strategy. The Human Resource Department is pulled in many directions and formal recruitment strategy development can be pushed back until it’s too late. Then the decision is made to ‘do the same thing we did last year.’ This is a very costly way of recruiting because recruitment is a very fluid dynamic.

In addition to cost, why is developing an effective recruiting strategy important?


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About the Author

Bill Humbert is an expert Recruitment Consultant with 30 years’ experience in the field. In his consulting business www.RecruiterGuy.com he focuses on one company at a time and charges a flat monthly fee for recruitment process improvement, recruitment marketing improvement, interview training, and recruitment. RecruiterGuy’s Guide to Finding a Job is his book that helps job seekers learn how to better understand the sales process known as a job search – and to be more effective than their competition. To read Bill Humbert’s complete biography, click here.

StrategyDriven Podcast Special Edition 9 – An Interview with Steve Kerr, author of Reward Systems

StrategyDriven Podcasts focus on the tools and techniques executives and managers can use to improve their organization’s alignment and accountability to ultimately achieve superior results. These podcasts elaborate on the best practice and warning flag posts on the StrategyDriven website.

Special Edition 9 – An Interview with Steve Kerr, author of Reward Systems examines how properly conceived and implemented reward systems create organizational alignment and increase execution efficiency and effectiveness. During our discussion, Steve Kerr, author of Reward Systems: Does Yours Measure Up? and Senior Advisor at Goldman Sachs, shares with us his insights regarding:

  • components of an effective reward system and how they help create organizational alignment
  • a three phase process for creating a reward system aligned with an organization’s strategic goals
  • how to introduce employees to a new or changing reward system
  • balancing performance, tenure, and attendance during reward determination
  • warning signs that an organization’s reward system is less than effective

Additional Information

Steve’s book, Reward Systems, can be purchased by clicking here.


About the Author

Steve Kerr, author of Reward Systems, is Senior Advisor at Goldman Sachs, where as Chief Learning Officer he created Pine Street, the firm’s distinctive leadership development organization. Prior to joining Goldman Sachs, Steve was the Chief Learning Officer at General Electric, where he led and expanded that organization’s world renowned Crotonville learning center. He has also served on the business school faculties at Ohio State University, the University of Michigan, and the University of Southern California. To read Steve’s full biography, click here.

Tactical Execution – Some Things Get Better with Time, at least for a while

StrategyDriven Tactical Execution ArticleExperience is almost universally valued. Those possessing it are viewed as being superior; able to perform tasks with more practiced efficiency and more easily recognizing and responding to challenges that would otherwise inhibit forward progress. The question, therefore, is this: “For a given position, will one’s experience-based effectiveness grow without limit?”


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