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StrategyDriven Marketing and Sales Quote

Leadership Inspirations – What People Believe

StrategyDriven Marketing and Sales Quote“People don’t believe what you tell them. They rarely believe what you show them. They often believe what their friends tell them. They always believe what they tell themselves.”

Seth Godin
American Author, Entrepreneur, and Business Executive

StrategyDriven Entrepreneurship Article

How do You Drive Website Conversions?

StrategyDriven Entrepreneurship ArticleHaving plenty of fresh visitors to your website is all well and good, but if you’re not converting those site visits into sales then you’re not actually accomplishing what you need. Having low conversion rates is one of the key signs that there is something wrong with your website service, and sometimes it takes just one factor to convince a potential customer to abandon your site in favor of one that is easier to use. If your conversion rates are lackluster, then it’s time that you gave some thought to the proven strategies that will encourage more sales and reduce your rate of site abandonment.

Calls to Action

Asking your site visitors to do something specific is known as a call to action (CTA). What you’re asking them to do will depend on your current marketing strategy, but usually it entails things like signing up for a newsletter, registering for a special offer, or voting in a poll. These are critical, because the longer that a customer stays on your site, the more chance you have of making a sale. It really is that simple. You want to provide something in return for their time, so make sure that your CTA results in unique content or offers that can’t be accessed without the action being taken. Your landing pages will be critical here, and need to be the right blend of simple to understand and a gateway to other pages on your site.

Use Testimonials

When up to 64% of consumers read online reviews before committing to a purchase, your testimonials are clearly important. Businesses that fail to make use of positive reviews are missing out on a vital marketing tool. Testimonials are effective because of a few factors. They add credibility to your brand, and by doing so, they also promote the right level of trust that may be the deciding factor when a site visitor is hesitant about finishing the sales process. In 2018, reviews have started to change in terms of consumer trends, and video testimonials are becoming much more prolific. These are particularly useful if your business is relatively new, and by making use of professionals to review your product, you are giving your testimony content an incredibly fresh and exciting new format for customers to enjoy.

Quality Content

From product descriptions to blog posts and white papers, content is one of the most important tools when it comes to boosting your conversion rates. This is largely because the best content will have the effect of boosting your SEO rankings, making it far easier for consumers with a specific need to find you. If you struggle with content or SEO marketing, then make use of www.blackbeltcommerce.com, who can design a content and marketing strategy that will see your SEO rankings rise and your conversions see a vast improvement. Mix up the type of content that you post, and assess your analytics to check which types work best for you.

Your conversion rates are a good indication of the health of your business, so it’s vital that you keep working at them to keep them as high as possible. If you follow the above advice, you will stand a much better chance of encouraging customers to commit to that all-important final click.

StrategyDriven Big Picture of Business Article

The Big Picture of Business – How Business Advice Turns Into Company Strategy

StrategyDriven Big Picture of Business ArticleWithin every corporate and organizational structure, there is a stair-step ladder. One enters the ladder at some level and is considered valuable for the category of services for which they have expertise. This ladder holds true for managers and employees within the organization, as well as outside consultants brought in.

Each rung on the ladder is important. At whatever level one enters the ladder, he-she is trained, measured for performance and fits into the organization’s overall Big Picture. One rarely advances more than one rung on the ladder during the course of service to the organization in question.

  1. Resource: equipment, tools, materials, schedules.
  2. Skills and Tasks: duties, activities, tasks, behaviors, attitudes, contracting, project fulfillment.
  3. Role and Job: assignments, responsibilities, functions, relationships, follow-through, accountability.
  4. Systems and Processes: structure, hiring, control, work design, supervision, decisions
  5. Strategy: planning, tactics, organizational development.
  6. Culture and Mission: values, customs, beliefs, goals, objectives, benchmarking.
  7. Philosophy: purpose, vision, quality of life, ethics, long-term growth.

7 Levels of Authority Figure

  1. Self Appointed. Flash in the Pan. What they were doing five years ago has no relationship to what they’re now marketing. They reap temporary rewards from momentary trends. They’re here today, weren’t an authority figure yesterday and likely won’t be tomorrow. Yet, today, they’re demanding your complete trust, respect and allegiance.
  2. Temporary Caretakers of an Office. Public officials. Appointed agency heads in a government bureaucracy. Respect is shown to the temporary trust they hold.
  3. Those Who We Think Control Our Destiny… for the Time Being. Caretakers of corporate bureaucracies, departmental supervisors, short-term clients, referral sources for business development and those who dangle carrots under people’s noses.
  4. Those Who Remain Through the Peter Principle. Supervisors and public servants who made fiefdoms by outlasting up-and-comers. Longevity is due to keeping their heads down and noses clean, rather than excelling via special talents-achievements. Still living on past laurels.
  5. Those Who Really Empower People. These are a rare breed… the backbone of well-run organizations. Some do what they do very well in poorly-run organizations. They may not be department heads, but they set exemplary standards and inspire others toward positive accomplishments. Category 2, 3 and 4 authority figures either resent them and try to claim credit for what they do… or are smart enough to place them in effective, visible roles. Some advance into management and encounter similar situations there too.
  6. Have Truly Earned Their Position-Respect. Also a rare breed. Those who excelled at every assignment given and each stage of their career. Never were too busy to set good examples, share ideas with others and help build the teams on which they played.
  7. Never Stop Paying Dues, Learning, Sharing Knowledge. The rarest breed of all. Distance runners who created knowledge, rather than conveyed that of other people. Though they could coast on past laurels, for them, the best is yet to come.

7 Levels of Advice Given

  1. Answers to Questions. There are 7 levels of answers which may be given, depending upon how extensive one wants: Easy and Obvious Ones, Knee-Jerk Reactions, Politically Correct, What People Want to Hear, Factual and Complete Explanations, Answers That Get Them Thinking Further and Deep Wisdom.
  2. Observations on Situations. These take the forms of “When this happened to me, I did X,” or “If this occurred with me, I would Y.” It’s often good to see things through someone else’s perspective.
  3. Subjective Viewpoint. Friends want what is best for you. This level of advice is usually pro-active and is influenced by the advisor’s experiences with comparable situations.
  4. Informed Opinion. Experts have core-business backgrounds upon which to draw. Advisors bring facts, analysis and methodologies of applying their solutions to your case. Niche consultants provide quality viewpoints… as it relates to their talents and skills. Carefully consider the sources.
  5. Researched Options. Investments in research (formal, informal, attitudinal, demographic, sociological) will avert unnecessary band aid surgery expenses later. Research leads to planning, which is the best way to accomplish tasks and benchmark success.
  6. Discussion of Outcomes-Consequences. Most actions and decisions in an organization affect many others. At this level, advisors recommend that sufficient planning be conducted… please take their advice. The more strategic and Big Picture in scope, then planning reaps long-term rewards.
  7. Inspiring Directions. This gets into Visioning. Planning and going to new heights are stimulating. The mannerisms and substance by which any organization achieves its Vision requires sophisticated advice, deep insights and creative ideas.

7 Levels-Tiers of Qualifying Consultants

  1. Wanna-be consultants. Vendors selling services. Subcontractors. Out-of-work people who hang out “consulting” shingles in between jobs. Freelancers and moonlighters, whose consultancy may or may not relate to their day jobs. (26%)
  2. Entry-level consultants. Those who were downsized, out-placed, retired or changed careers, launching a consulting practice. Prior experience in company environment. (19.5%)
  3. Grinders. Those who do the bulk of project work. Conduct programs designed by others. 1-10 years’ consulting experience. (35.49%)
  4. Minders. Mid-level consultants. Those with specific niche or industry expertise, starting to build a track record. 10-20 years’ consulting experience. (13.5%)
  5. Finders. Firms which package and market services. Most claim they have all expertise in-house. The more sophisticated ones are skilled at building and utilizing collaborations of outside experts and joint ventures. (3.5%)
  6. Senior level. Veteran consultants (20 years+) who were trained for and have a track record in consulting. That’s what they have done for most of their careers. (2%)
  7. Beyond the strata of consultant. Senior advisor, routinely producing original knowledge. Strategic overview, vision expeditor. Creativity-insight not available elsewhere.

About the Author

Hank MoorePower Stars to Light the Business Flame, by Hank Moore, encompasses a full-scope business perspective, invaluable for the corporate and small business markets. It is a compendium book, containing quotes and extrapolations into business culture, arranged in 76 business categories.

Hank’s latest book functions as a ‘PDR of business,’ a view of Big Picture strategies, methodologies and recommendations. This is a creative way of re-treading old knowledge to enable executives to master change rather than feel as they’re victims of it.

Power Stars to Light the Business Flame is now out in all three e-book formats: iTunes, Kindle, and Nook.

StrategyDriven Entrepreneurship Article

A Must-Read Guide for Starting a Warehousing Business

StrategyDriven Entrepreneurship ArticleIt’s common for both small businesses and independent contractors to have limited storage space for their products. To accommodate the growth of their business, they might turn to large warehouse facilities to house their ranges.

A warehousing business could potentially be a lucrative venture, but you’ll need to identify the products you want to store and the right building size for your needs. Below are some top tips for starting a warehousing business.

Understand Your Startup Requirements

Never enter a new business without doing your homework. Not only will you need to establish your startup costs, which can range from $10,000 to $50,000, but you must review the competition in your area. Review local business listings to see how many industry rivals you need to compete with. You should also visit their website to determine the various services they provide, target demographic, and price ranges.

Call Other Warehousing Businesses

Your local competitors will more than likely not be willing to share the key to success, or the common pitfalls they face. However, companies far away from your destination might be more likely to offer advice and tips on how to make your first venture work, so give them a call.

The Correct Licenses & Equipment

If you are confident you have what it takes to make a warehousing business work, you’ll need to register for a DBA (doing business as), which you can obtain from either your local county or city administration office. The good news is, this will only cost between $25 and $50.

Most of your money will be spent on your warehousing equipment, such as shelving units, crates, forklifts, and storage units (such as freezers and refrigerators). It’s also vital to invest in highly efficient LED lighting. A truck might also be an essential investment for your company’s distribution services, as it will enable you to deliver products locally to clients.

Purchase Inventory Software

Effective organization is an important element for a successful warehousing business. If you want to accurately keep track of every item in your warehouse, you must buy inventory software. This will monitor the entrance, product location, and exit of each item, so you’ll never misplace an item or cause a delivery delay.

Hire Your First Employees

Of course, you cannot run a warehousing business without employees. Improve efficiency and professionalism by hiring candidates who have extensive experience in logistics, if you plan to provide distribution services to your clients. They will be responsible for organizing shipping and tracking the products to a final destination point.

You must also hire a person to check items in as they arrive, set-up the product locations in the warehouse, and label sections from A to Z. Not forgetting you’ll need to hire staff to both lift and operate forklifts for picking.

Find Customers

To generate leads for your business, you should sign up to the International Warehouse Logistics Association. The local listing could help you to secure nearby clients to start storing your first products. You should also call local companies to promote your services and explain the key benefits of working with your business.

StrategyDriven Entrepreneurship Article

Are These Problems Restricting Growth In Your Business?

StrategyDriven Entrepreneurship ArticleYou may have the greatest product the world has ever seen (we like to be optimistic). Your staff may be of the highest calibre. And you have reliable customers using your business on a regular basis. But if your business isn’t growing, there is clearly something wrong somewhere. You could sit back and hope the situation improves – and it might – but it’s worth getting to the root source of any possible issues. In this article, we will look at some of the problems that may be restricting growth in your business.

Problem #1: You have a limited online presence

You probably understand already how your business can benefit from an online presence, but you need to extend your reach beyond the typical environs of your website. Improve your marketing attempts on social media, by utilising social media buttons on your site, and encouraging your customers to pass the word about your worth. Contribute to other blogs, and ask the blogger for permission to use backlinks to your site. And consider the benefit of SEO services to improve your presence on Google’s page rankings, getting your website from page 101 to page 1 on the search engine.

Problem #2: You are spending too much money

You want your business to be the best it can be, but spending too much can eat into your profits. So, if you are constantly splashing out on technologies your business doesn’t need, and if you are neglecting practical ways to save money across your business, you won’t see much growth within your bank balance. Only buy what you need, keep money in reserves for rainy day emergencies, and look for ways to reduce the costs in both your small and large expenses.

Problem #3: You aren’t spending enough money

Sorry for the apparent contradiction, but you should see our point. While you don’t want to overspend on the things that don’t matter, there are some areas in your business where you should invest your money to make growth possible. These areas include marketing, staff training, and even a change in premises if your business is dependent on your location in town. Again, save money where you can when focusing on these things, but make them a priority when choosing where to spend your money.

Problem #4: Fear of rejection

Don’t be a wallflower, and don’t let your fears of rejection from others paralyse your business. You need to push yourself, not only within your marketing efforts but in building relationships with others. Get to know the people within your industry, and learn from their valued advice. Get yourself to conferences and other industry events to meet them. Talk to your customers, and ask them for referrals. Use social media and face-to-face contact to ask them. Speak to your staff and ask them for advice from time to time, and if you are struggling in any way, let them shoulder some of your burdens. By putting yourself out there, people will know what you need, and they will help you in ways that may benefit the overall status of your business.

Problem #5: You!

StrategyDriven Entrepreneurship Article

Sorry, but you may be holding the business back from growth. The previous point illustrates this to a degree, but there may be other problems inherent in your leadership. You may be pushing your staff too hard, causing burnout and unproductivity. You may not be pushing them enough, meaning your staff aren’t being as efficient as they could be. You may be doing too much or too little yourself, so delegate those tasks you struggle with yourself, and concentrate your efforts into the tasks you can do well. Be polite to your customers, and don’t do anything that will cause them to dislike you. Take a long hard look at yourself and reflect on your behaviour within your business. You don’t have to be perfect, but if you are doing anything that acts as a detriment to your business growing, start making changes to better yourself and your practices today.

Problem #6: Your rivals are better than you

Why should somebody choose your business over that of your nearest rival? You need to be better than the competition, outsmarting them at every turn. This includes pricing your product or service competitively, offering discounts and promotional deals to beat your rival in sales, and excelling with whatever it is you are offering the customer, ensuring quality is the key word within every facet of your business. In business, you are at war – you are fighting to keep your customers on your side – so always be alert to what your rivals are doing, and resolve to beat them in everything you do.

Problem #7: You are not learning from your mistakes

Nobody is perfect, so don’t worry if you make mistakes. You are human, after all. But taking the previous points in this article as examples, you may have made some fundamental errors in your business. Your website may not have been up to scratch. You may have neglected to market your business properly. You may have had issues with your spending. And you may have managed other facets of your business incorrectly. It’s tough running a business, so don’t sweat it if you do make mistakes here and there. But here’s the thing. If you don’t learn from your mistakes, your business will never grow. If you fail to make corrections to weak areas within yourself or your business, there will be little or no change, other than towards the negative. Look at your mistakes, figure out what went wrong, and move forward with a head for change, and a vision to better yourself. Only then will growth take place, not only within your business, but in your personal life too.

Final word

Let’s be honest. It takes time to grow a business, and profits don’t come quickly. But to ensure growth, you do need to tackle any problems that can hinder your chances of success. Follow the tips in this article, and reach out to other people within your business and social circles who can help you deal with any of the potential problems you may be facing.